V: Vulgarité: Venturing out into the Vast and Voluptuous World of Cultural Différences

It was 2013, mon chéri was talking to me and mon neveu. It was a conversation innocente about Minecraft – one of the games the two really enjoyed. I don’t remember how this word came into the conversation, (they were probably in the middle of a fight with the Creepers and his personnage was killed) but it did: damn. Mon neveu didn’t flinch or show any sign that he heard this word (thankfully), but it sparked a later conversation between mon chéri and I about what’s considered too vulgaire to say in front of kids and certain adultes (my famille is not one in which swearing is a thing).

Vulgarité has been a touchy sujet since the Puritans arrived in North America. In fact, Américains are taught from a very young age that certain things are just off limits in some situations. What things? Vulgarité. Which situations? All of them except when you’re with your friends who use profanity. This éducation has created an uncomfortable sensation any time we encounter someone who steps out of the norm and uses a vulgaire word when he/she should not. Even today, in my 30s, I get uncomfortable when my French friends throw English swear words around (my réaction is often: “Wow slow down there – save some for when you’ll really need them!”); however, I’ve no problème using the French équivalent. Why is that?

Well, in France, vulgaire words are not seen in the same light as in the US. For exemple, when someone uses a vulgaire word during a conversation among adultes or even older kids (high school age) with a 10 year old in earshot, Américains tend to cringe. This réaction causes the child to either say, “That’s a bad word! I’m telling mommy!” or to be a rebel and répète the word. In France, there is no “cringe” effect. In fact, no one really cares. I’ve also never heard a French child use profanity (and I’ve encountered quite a few kids being a teacher and all).

Let’s get something straight: In général, the French don’t use profanity when directly facing kids (and, bien-sûr, children are taught proper French in schools); but, they will use profanity while talking with other adultes when there are kids within earshot. Another différence culturelle: In France, swear words are generally not used to call people names. They are mostly used as gap fillers or part of an expression (positive ou négative)

For exemple, you’re explaining a story to your père about how someone in your appartement complexe stole one of the tires off of your car. His réaction: “Putain!” If you look up this word as an expression (a word as a word and a word as an expression are not always the same) in WordReference, you will find that it means “Shit!” or “Fuck!” However, they aren’t viewed as bad as those words in English.

However, this norm no longer applies when you’re driving. Driving really brings out the connards

Of course, there are some people who use words like “pute” to describe someone (usually a female), but this is rare and mostly used by a spécifique personality type. For exemple, someone who’s trying pickup/harasse women…Spécialement if he has just been jaded/blocked.

The use of profanity can be a bit difficile for Américains expats and travelers to get used to. The way that profanity is used in France is a vast and voluptuous différence culturelle than that in the USA. If you’re not préparé(e) in avance, you will be in for quite the révélation. Just keep an open mind and understand that profanity is not put on a pedestal apart from everything else, which is one raison why no one really cares. Éventuellement, expats often find themselves using vulgaire words in French when they would not use them in the same sentence translated into English. Sometimes, expats even end up supplementing vulgaire words in French while speaking in English (yes, this has happened to me)! It’s funny to think about, but it’s réalité.

While profanity is still more accepted (and thus not really seen as “bad”) in France, the use of profanity is increasing in the US.

Perhaps this is due to shows like South Park or perhaps we are just swaying further away from our Puritan ancestors…Whatever be the case, vulgarité is on the rise, though US société is still far from being anywhere near France’s. ♦


This is part of a blogging challenge: Topics ranging from A-Z. You can follow my challenge by clicking on the links below:

A: Adulthood: The Age of Absolute Ambiguïté 

B: Bilingue: La Vie is Better Being Bilingual

C: Christianisme: Combing the Cliffs of Clarté.

D: Death: Dealing with the Décès of My Dad

E: Éducation: The Endeavor of Easing into French Écoles

F: Food: Fancy or Faulty in France?

G: Going: Going Going Gone!

H: Home: My Heart Has Two Harbors

I: Interests: Intelligent, Insightful, Incredible!

J: Joy: La Jalousie is Overcome by La Joie

K: Khimar: Kind and Kooky Knitted Clothing Traditions

L: Lesson Plans: Leading the “Little Ones” into Language through Laughable Leçons

M: Musique: The Many Musicians Making Love on the Streets of Aix

N: Naughty or Nice?: Not Only Noticing the Différences, But Also the Similarités Between France and the U.S.

O: Obéi: Only Open to Obeying the Rules of the Road in…

P: PACS: Passionate Partners Pledging L’amour

Q: Questions: A Queen’s Quest for Clarté

R: Raisons: Riding on the Pony of Real Reasons (to Take the A-Z Challenge)

S: Study Abroad: Smiles and Sadness Set the Scène

T: Travel: Time to Hit the Trail!

U: Under the Influence: An Ugly Upward Climb Until Reaching the Summit

V: Vulgarité: Venturing out into the Vast and Voluptuous World of Cultural Différences

W: Walking: The Wise and Watchful Médiéval Wanderer

X: Xenial: A Xenodochial but not Xenophobic Host in France

Advertisements

T: Travel: Time to Hit the Trail!

Hans Christian Andersen is right: “To travel is to live.” I préfère to take Andersen’s quotation as it is:  You aren’t really living unless you’re traveling the world.

Why is this the cas? Well, Batutta couldn’t have answered it better:

When I took a trip to Waikiki Beach in Honolulu on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu in 2008, I witnessed exactly what Battuda expressed: “Traveling [. . .] leaves you speechless“…

…”then turns you into a storyteller.”

You see, I’m from Chicago. The plains. The flatlands. The Midwest. Visiting a city on the Pacific coast…on an island…with mountains was, well, breathtaking.

Diamond Head.

I had stories to go with every photo I took!

I couldn’t agree more (see my series on the chapitres I’ve read).

From Jacksonville Beach to Savannah to Memphis to San Diego to National City (CA) to Anaheim to Hollywood to Las Vegas to Honolulu to New Orleans to Panama City Beach to Knoxville to Tybee Island to Savannah (during St. Patrick’s Day!) to Memphis (to see ma chère amie graduate from Pharmacy School) to Aix-en-Provence (to study abroad) to Nice to Monte-Carlo to Eze to Saint-Tropez to Marseille to Les Gorges du Verdon to Paris to Venice to Rome to Florence to Barcelone to Tours to Briançon and back again…I continue to read this earth and I don’t plan on stopping any time  soon.

5 Raisons How Traveling is Living:

  • It opens up the mind to other cultures.
  • It expands géographique knowledge.
  • It teaches you about yourself.
  • It forces you out of your comfort zone.
  • It enables you to meet and even make friends with a variété of faces.

This is part of a blogging challenge: Topics ranging from A-Z. You can follow my challenge by clicking on the links below:

A: Adulthood: The Age of Absolute Ambiguïté 

B: Bilingue: La Vie is Better Being Bilingual

C: Christianisme: Combing the Cliffs of Clarté.

D: Death: Dealing with the Décès of My Dad

E: Éducation: The Endeavor of Easing into French Écoles

F: Food: Fancy or Faulty in France?

G: Going: Going Going Gone!

H: Home: My Heart Has Two Harbors

I: Interests: Intelligent, Insightful, Incredible!

J: Joy: La Jalousie is Overcome by La Joie

K: Khimar: Kind and Kooky Knitted Clothing Traditions

L: Lesson Plans: Leading the “Little Ones” into Language through Laughable Leçons

M: Musique: The Many Musicians Making Love on the Streets of Aix

N: Naughty or Nice?: Not Only Noticing the Différences, But Also the Similarités Between France and the U.S.

O: Obéi: Only Open to Obeying the Rules of the Road in…

P: PACS: Passionate Partners Pledging L’amour

Q: Questions: A Queen’s Quest for Clarté

R: Raisons: Riding on the Pony of Real Reasons (to Take the A-Z Challenge)

S: Study Abroad: Smiles and Sadness Set the Scène

T: Travel: Time to Hit the Trail!

U: Under the Influence: An Ugly Upward Climb Until Reaching the Summit

V: Vulgarité: Venturing out into the Vast and Voluptuous World of Cultural Différences

W: Walking: The Wise and Watchful Médiéval Wanderer

X: Xenial: A Xenodochial but not Xenophobic Host in France

Chapitre 18: Nothing but Nifty Beaches and Musées in Nice, France

Nice was the first séjour during my study abroad expérience in Aix.

I was hypnotisée from the moment I stepped foot on the pebble plage, or beach.

Sure, it wasn’t the most plage idéale, but it was a nifty one!

After walking down the plage, I found myself on the Quai des États-Unis:

But, I wasn’t in Nice just for their plages

I also went to the marché

and I enjoyed a culture spectacle

while I was admiring some bonbons

and debating whether or not to buy some dried tomates!

As I embraced this Baroque ville,

I took avantage of the Journées Européennes du Patrimoine: I toured churches, palais, and musées that were not normalement ouverts au public.

Chapelle de la Miséricorde (no intérieur photos allowed)

It was an amazing, un-photographed expérience.

(Except, the extérieur…)

But, my Nice-acquisition-de-l’histoire didn’t stop at these belle places, I also entrée in Palais Lascaris (the only one that allowed photographie – sans flash, bien-sûr!).

  

5 Raisons to Hurt Your Pieds Walking on a Plage in Nice:

  • The water is crystal claire!

There’s no better way to relax your sore pieds than taking a dip in the claire water!

  • The vue!

The vue of Nice from the plage is breathtaking!

  • A lot of plage, few people. 

I guess a pebble plage doesn’t attract as many (there are still touristestouristes like a sable plage, thus leaving you with plenty of rock to soak up the soleil!

The pebble plages are naturelles: The pebbles are washed down and deposited from the Var and Paillon Rivières/Fleuves – an activité that has been in place for eons.

  • Pic-nique free of sable!

Ever get tired of finding sable in your sandwich? Ou worse, not being able to tell if it’s sel (salt), or sable mixed in with your chips? A pebble plage will let you eat in paix!

  • Calming vagues (waves).

If you like surfing, then Nice is not for you. However, if you’re up for a nice relaxing stroll on the pebbles or a nice relaxing dip in the water, then Nice is definitely for you!

Soaking up the soleil with some lavande ou olive noir (ou stracciatella) flavored gelato is my kind of idée of a vacance université outing.

Add the gorgeous volets…

and, bien-sûr, the musées, palais, and churches for a bit of fun hors du soleil and voilàThe parfait vacance! ♦


“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.” Saint Augustine.

Declaring La Grossesse (pregnancy) and What Follows…

I’ve written about the woes of the first trimester, the sudden return of énergie during the second trimester, the craziness of the third trimester, the perks of pregnancy, and whether or not travelling while pregnant is a good idée; however, I have yet to write about what to expect after declaring your pregnancy in France. So, here goes…

As mentioned here and here, once you discover you’re pregnant, you must declare this pregnancy at La CAF (a government agency responsible for familial allocations) before the 14th week (if you decide to follow through with the pregnancy). But, don’t fret if you don’t make it to La CAF before the 14th week. If you end up in the 2nd or 3rd trimesters, you can still declare the pregnancy. Honnêtement, the raison the gouvernement prefers you declare early: the paperwork takes FOREVER! With La CAF, the family has the right to 923.08€* the month after the first birth. After that, the family receives 184.62€* a month until the child turns 3. It’s 4 months after the birth and we still haven’t received our allocations yet. There are a ton of required documents but La CAF is known for not telling you about them all at once, so, you end up having to make several trips just to hand in documents.

Making the decision to continue the pregnancy is only the beginning! After that, there’s finding an hôpital, a mid-wife, a place to take pregnancy préparation courses…the liste continues. This can be quite overwhelming for an expat who has very few French ties in this catégorie.

Once you find the hôpital where you want to give birth, you schedule an appointment to register there. I chose to give birth at L’étoile.

At the registration appointment, mon chéri and I received a folder full of important documents to fill out.

We also received a booklet full of information: Everything from the birthing experience through to taking care of a toddler can be learned from this book.

The hôpital takes very good care of you. As an expat with very few Français connections to give advice in this département, I was lost in a sea of paperwork and questions. The hôpital was my saveur! They gave me a liste of mid-wives who give prénatal preparation courses, which certainly took a load off my shoulders. They also provided me with a gynécologue, a liste of required things to bring to the hôpital once in labor…

…and an explanation of what to expect during my stay. Though, no matter how “prepared” you think you are for the birth, you’re never prepared enough and that’s ok. ♦

*These numbers depict the maximum amount that a family can receive from la CAF. Of course, how much you actually get depends on your impôts (taxes). 


This is part of a series on my pregnancy in France. You can follow my pregnancy and gain helpful insight on what pregnancy is like in France by reading these blogs:

S: Study Abroad: Smiles and Sadness Set the Scène

As my French studies were coming to an end, I had to make a décision: finish my degree without studying abroad or study abroad. I knew I owed it to my future French students to experience French first-hand, so, after months of debating the pros and cons, I made the décision to study abroad in France. It was the best décision I could have ever made in my life (and one of the most expensive décision, too)! There are two major characteristics that sum up my experience: smiles and sadness.

When I stepped onto the KLM flight, I had no idée what I was in for. I was nervous, excited, sad.

It’s true what they say after you return home: no one understands you (and you feel lonely as a result of this) and you are no longer the same person you were before you left home. Somewhere between the pain au chocolat, the hardcore French classes, meeting mon chéri, and traveling with my study abroad friends (SAFF), I became a changed woman. But, how did this happen?

I arrived in Aix in Septembre 2012.

It took me about a month and a half before I truly warmed up to the city.*

Why did it take this long? Well, for starters: I was alone for the first time Ever.

My boyfriend (of 7 years) at the time was hardly responding to my calls and texts. All of my family and friends were in the U.S. Needless to say, I felt like my life as I knew it was slipping through my fingers.

How did I overcome this feeling?

  • I made friends.

Chipotle in Paris. We. Just. Had. To.

  • I traveled with these friends.

Firenze, Italie.

  • I made progress in speaking, understanding, and communicating in a foreign language, so, ordering a baguette, a crêpe, a sandwich became easier.

  • I met mon chéri.

Traveling in Barcelone, Espagne.

  • I embraced the culture.

Making the French version of Christmas cookies.

  • I decided to take risques – in the sense that I would not miss out on experiences just because I was nerveuse, homesick, or whatever…

I tutored French with mon chéri (of course, this was before he became mon chéri). I said, “Oui” to mon chéri‘s (before he became mon chéri, of course) offer to show me les jardins d’Albertas, which was a brisk car ride away from Aix. (I went alone! But, I told my host mom where I was going because you never know…)

I traveled in France to Paris (with my SAFF)…

Climbing up to Sacré Cœur.

and to Lyon (with my two favorite mecs)…

as well as outside of France to Italie:

Venezia

Roma

and Firenze (with SA

FF)…

& Barcelone, Espagne (with mon chéri and 2 SAFF).

We drove to Barcelone.

  • I decided to accept that some things just weren’t meant to last. It was time for a change – time to move on. I was libérée.

When it came time to leave, there were tears. Back in Septembre 2012, I never would have thought that in Décembre, I’d never want to leave Aix. Even today (2015), I find myself reminiscing about the times I shared with my SAFF. I miss it; I miss them.

I miss the feeling of excitement and anxiousness of exploring a city that I didn’t know would become my permanent home.

And, of course the traveling with fresh eyes.

Firenze, Italie.

When you miss something so badly that you want to scream, you also want to talk about it.

Eventually, people back home begin to tire of your stories. They no longer know where their place is in your life (even though you know that you secretly wished they took part with you in your adventures). It becomes very difficile for them, for you! What can you do? You keep in contact with your SAFF so that you can still share stories and talk about the “good ol’ days” without offending anyone. At the same time, you learn who’s really important in your life and you “glue” them to your hip. And, sometime after you’ve returned/moved abroad, they will find a way to come visit you…And you can share your experience with them. ♦

*When you find yourself feeling all alone in a foreign land, don’t worry. Give yourself at least a month to get used to the culture différente and to make friends. It takes time, but by the end of this experience you won’t want to get on that return flight.


This is part of a blogging challenge: Topics ranging from A-Z. You can follow my challenge by clicking on the links below:

A: Adulthood: The Age of Absolute Ambiguïté 

B: Bilingue: La Vie is Better Being Bilingual

C: Christianisme: Combing the Cliffs of Clarté.

D: Death: Dealing with the Décès of My Dad

E: Éducation: The Endeavor of Easing into French Écoles

F: Food: Fancy or Faulty in France?

G: Going: Going Going Gone!

H: Home: My Heart Has Two Harbors

I: Interests: Intelligent, Insightful, Incredible!

J: Joy: La Jalousie is Overcome by La Joie

K: Khimar: Kind and Kooky Knitted Clothing Traditions

L: Lesson Plans: Leading the “Little Ones” into Language through Laughable Leçons

M: Musique: The Many Musicians Making Love on the Streets of Aix

N: Naughty or Nice?: Not Only Noticing the Différences, But Also the Similarités Between France and the U.S.

O: Obéi: Only Open to Obeying the Rules of the Road in…

P: PACS: Passionate Partners Pledging L’amour

Q: Questions: A Queen’s Quest for Clarté

R: Raisons: Riding on the Pony of Real Reasons (to Take the A-Z Challenge)

S: Study Abroad: Smiles and Sadness Set the Scène

T: Travel: Time to Hit the Trail!

U: Under the Influence: An Ugly Upward Climb Until Reaching the Summit

V: Vulgarité: Venturing out into the Vast and Voluptuous World of Cultural Différences

W: Walking: The Wise and Watchful Médiéval Wanderer

X: Xenial: A Xenodochial but not Xenophobic Host in France

2015: A Countdown

As 2016 rings in with a POP and then santé over Champagne, I realize that I’ve accomplished a lot in this past year. And on top of my accomplishments, I have a lot to be thankful for. There’s no better way to show my accomplishments and gratitudes than through numbers, so, here’s my 2015 countdown:

15 primaire classes taught (via the TAPIF program) at primaire schools in Marseille. Who would have thought I’d be teaching English overseas?

One of my students made this for me during a leçon about how Américains children celebrate Valentine’s Day.

14 Juillet in Aix-en-Provence. This was my third time celebrating Bastille Day in France; yet each time I celebrate it, it comes with new memories and a better appreciation for French culture (and not to mention the feu d’artifice in Paris).

13 [yummy] desserts Provençal nicely settled in my tummy (see this post for a more detailed account of the 13 desserts).

La pompe à l’huile (in the centre), une mandarine, une figue séchéeun nougat blanc, une datte, une noix, une amande, une noisetteun calisson, un morceau de chocolat, une pomme (apple), une poire (pear), un nougat noir (it’s behind the pompe).

12 hours a week of helping ELL/ESL students acquire English (I started out in primaire and now I’m in secondaire).

11 after school English classes successfully taught (over a period of 2 months) at The English Bubble.

10 friends and family who gave Rachel clothes at my Baby Shower…(I won’t even begin to count the number of clothes she has in addition to those from the Shower – Thanks to my brother and my sister-in-law as well as several friends who gave us two suitcases and two cardboard boxes full of clothes…as I mentioned above, I have a lot to be thankful for – baby clothes aren’t cheap & aren’t put to use for very long, either).

9 months of pregnancy survécu (survived). I’ve even documented my experiences during each trimester here, here, and here!

8 airline flights successfully taken. Being cupped up inside an airline cabin isn’t my ideal way of spending 9 hours…But, the destination(s) is are worth it.

7 nouveaux restaurants essayés (Aix-en-Provence and Illinois):

  • Burger Bar (la Maison du HanDBurger) (Aix-en-Provence)

This place sells handmade burgers & offers three types of burger meat: beef, combination beef & lamb, and chicken. I opted for the beef and it was amazingly delicious. There’s one downside to this restaurant: They gave us a jug of water that had dust and hair in it (it must’ve been sitting out). Aside from the water, it’s a great place for an Américain who’s missing a nice, juicy handmade burger.

Les Ravioli Japonais (aka Fried pork dumplings).

This is one of the most friendly Asian restaurants in Aix – the server even gave us a free house cocktail (I was pregnant, of course, so, the server gave me juice instead)!

Le porc au gingembre.

This restaurant offers huge, savoureux plats Asiatique – I was barely able to finish mine!

  • Ô Zen (Aix-en-Provence) *****

This restaurant is an Asian buffet! It’s expensive, but the food is delicious and plentiful (even the sushi is up to par!). We chose this restaurant on Halloween – it was a fantastic idée!

Tucked inside the Morton Arboretum, this restaurant offers healthy and delicious lunches, though, they come with a price! Most of the food is organic, locally grown, and free-range.

The highlight of this restaurant wasn’t the juicy, tender BBQ, it was the truffe mac ‘n cheese (ok, they were both beyond delicious!)! It’s also situated across from a frozen custard restaurant called Lickity Split Frozen Custard and Sweets. What better way to settle BBQ than having frozen custard for dessert?!

Nestled between Pulaski and Roscoe, this restaurant équatorien offers huge, delicious plates! Plus, there’s often musique on Saturday’s.

6 successful English leçons on how Américains celebrate holiday’s (Valentine’s Day, Saint Patrick’s Day, Easter, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Noël).

5 months of waiting…and then I finally received my titre de séjour (residency card)!

4th of July in the U.S. I introduced mon chéri to a typical Chicagoan Independence Américain Day Party (see this post for more on my trip to the U.S.). 

3 cities in 3 countries visited for the first time: Stockholm, Suede; Copenhagen, Denmark; and Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2 games of Belote won (let’s not get into how many I’ve lost)! Finalement, I’m starting to “master” the game…

1 newborn bébé. (Yep, I’ve survécu giving birth!)

So, I know it’s the time of year to make résolutions, but I’ve decided to look back on what I’ve accomplished (a lot has to do with teaching, and that’s ok because it’s what I love!) and what I have to be thankful for instead. Sure, I hope to have a wonderful year with my new famille, but I wouldn’t consider that a résolution…it’s a Given! ♦

P: PACS: Passionate Partners Pledging L’amour

Mon chéri and I at our Baby Shower (Juin 2015).

The sun was a radiating orange  when mon chéri and I took the 25 minute walk to the Notaire. I was in shorts and a dressy top; he was in jeans and a tee-shirt. What can I say? We were meant for each other. 😉

On June 15, 2015, my boyfriend and I entered into a PACS (Pacte Civil de Solidarité) contrat. I’ve mentioned our pact herehere, and here. But, I’ve yet to discuss the confusion that comes with entering into a civil union – confusion brought on by a mariage-focused société.

For exemple, mon chéri is no longer my “boyfriend” – by signing a contrat, in front of a notaire, vowing to love one another and to live together for the rest of our lives, we’ve taken our relationship to another level. By asking, “how’s your boyfriend?” You demote our relationship. I cringe every time I hear this question – hell, every time I hear someone use “boyfriend” to refer to mon chéri. But, I don’t blame you for using it because you don’t know what to use in its place.

What can you use? I struggle with this one. Before the school year started, I was calling mon chéri, “my partner”. The problème with this is that it invokes “same-sex” relationships. So, people are surprised when I follow a “my partner” sentence with, “he…” In France, no one understood why I used this term. At the lycée, students asked, “ok, so, that means he’s your boyfriend?”

…Um…no.

My neighbor calls him, “ton mari,” your husband. At first, I personally didn’t accept this title because I was under the impression that he hadn’t earned it yet (aka we aren’t married). I accepted that it was her title to use because, let’s face it, we really are husband and wife with or without the church saying so. So, while we’ve already pledged our love in front of a notaire, we haven’t yet done so in front of a priest. But, after months of “how’s your husband?,” I realize that he doesn’t need to spend tons of money on a ring nor declare his love for me in front of a priest to be called my husband. We declared our love in front of God the day we fell in love. I don’t think I’d call him my husband while in the U.S. (as it would confuse a lot of people), but it certainly makes things easier in France to use the term – especially since PACS is exactly like mariage in that it’s an option on governmental papers (so, “my PACS husband” works out very well). I have opted for the term ‘my fiancé‘ when explaining my relationship with my students; however, I’m not sure if this would be an acceptable term to use in the U.S. Since there’s no ‘ring’ obligation. And, sadly, a lot of Américains agree.

Thankfully, in France, we have all of these options (with the exception of adoption as a couple*) through our PACS. It amazes me that so many Américains don’t want civil partnerships to have the same rights as married couples. I don’t understand the “validité” of this argument in a société that is supposed to have a separation between religion and state. After all, not every couple has the same religious beliefs and not everyone is ready to spend the money on an extravagant church wedding. Sometimes, a civil union is just more logical and practical.

So, we’ve gone the PACS route. And, sadly, I still haven’t found a good term to use. So, if you have any ideas…please comment!

*A PACS couple has the right to adopt, but not as a couple, instead one personne from the union would complete the adoption. ♦


This is part of a blogging challenge: Topics ranging from A-Z. You can follow my challenge by clicking on the links below:

A: Adulthood: The Age of Absolute Ambiguïté 

B: Bilingue: La Vie is Better Being Bilingual

C: Christianisme: Combing the Cliffs of Clarté

D: Death: Dealing with the Décès of My Dad

E: Éducation: The Endeavor of Easing into French Écoles

F: Food: Fancy or Faulty in France?

G: Going: Going Going Gone!

H: Home: My Heart Has Two Harbors

I: Interests: Intelligent, Insightful, Incredible!

J: Joy: La Jalousie is Overcome by La Joie

K: Khimar: Kind and Kooky Knitted Clothing Traditions

L: Lesson Plans: Leading the “Little Ones” into Language through Laughable Leçons

M: Musique: The Many Musicians Making Love on the Streets of Aix

N: Naughty or Nice?: Not Only Noticing the Différences, But Also the Similarités Between France and the U.S.

O: Obéi: Only Open to Obeying the Rules of the Road in…

P: PACS: Passionate Partners Pledging L’amour

Q: Questions: A Queen’s Quest for Clarté

R: Raisons: Riding on the Pony of Real Reasons (to Take the A-Z Challenge)

S: Study Abroad: Smiles and Sadness Set the Scène

T: Travel: Time to Hit the Trail!

U: Under the Influence: An Ugly Upward Climb Until Reaching the Summit

V: Vulgarité: Venturing out into the Vast and Voluptuous World of Cultural Différences

W: Walking: The Wise and Watchful Médiéval Wanderer

X: Xenial: A Xenodochial but not Xenophobic Host in France